Careers

at Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital
Patient-Centered · Technology Forward · Award-Winning

At Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital, our ultimate mission is to restore quality of life for our patients, helping them return to their highest possible range of mobility and the activities they most enjoy. Fulfilling that mission requires investing in the latest technological advances but most importantly, it requires dedicated, compassionate medical professionals.

When you join Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital, you’ll be part of a specialized team of surgeons, anesthesiologists, neuroradiologists, internal medicine physicians and nurses committed to promoting vitality and transforming lives.

Our dedication shows not only in the awards we’ve received over the years, but in the smiles on our patients’ faces. You can read some of our patient testimonials here.

We also offer competitive pay and benefits. Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or any other protected category as required by state and federal law.

How to Apply

Interested candidates should email their resumes to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is participating in a Medicare initiative called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model. The CJR aims to promote quality and financial accountability for care with regard to lower-extremity joint replacement (LEJR) procedures, commonly referred to as hip and knee replacements, and/or other major leg procedures.

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is working closely with the doctors and other health care providers and suppliers who will care for you during and following your hospital stay, and extending through the recovery period. By working together, your health care providers and suppliers are planning more efficient, high quality care as you undergo treatment. The CJR model is expected to lower the cost of care to Medicare, but your costs for covered care will not increase due to these changes.

To provide more coordinated services, Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital has entered into Collaborator Agreements with orthopedic surgeons who perform total knee and hip replacement surgeries at our hospital.

Learn more about CJR and how it affects your care.

CJR Physician Collaborators

Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement – Physician Collaborators with Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital

Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is participating in a Medicare initiative called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model. The CJR aims to promote quality and financial accountability for care with regard to lower-extremity joint replacement (LEJR) procedures, commonly referred to as hip and knee replacements, and/or other major leg procedures.

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is working closely with the doctors and other health care providers and suppliers who will care for you during and following your hospital stay, and extending through the recovery period. By working together, your health care providers and suppliers are planning more efficient, high quality care as you undergo treatment. The CJR model is expected to lower the cost of care to Medicare, but your costs for covered care will not increase due to these changes.

To provide more coordinated services, Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital has entered into Collaborator Agreements with orthopedic surgeons who perform total knee and hip replacement surgeries at our hospital.

Learn more about CJR and
how it affects your care.

CJR Physician Collaborators

Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement – Physician Collaborators with Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital

Hip & Knee Replacement

Does knee or hip pain prevent you from enjoying the things you like to do? Have everyday tasks, like walking up the stairs or getting out of the car, become difficult? Then it may be time to consult with an orthopedic surgeon regarding joint replacement surgery.


We understand that considering joint replacement surgery is a big decision. Our surgeons will be able to diagnose your condition and will then work with you to discuss all your options so you can make the most well-informed decision for your needs.


Our surgeons are skilled in the latest treatment options and surgical techniques for partial and total joint replacement. Some procedures can be performed with the latest advance in technology - Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery - offering surgery that is less invasive and more precise, which means a faster, less painful recovery. Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is the first to introduce this technology in Kansas.


At Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital, the Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology is used for partial knee replacement, total knee replacement, and total hip replacement.

Common Conditions Treated

The most common joint replacement procedures are the hip and knee. The leading causes of joint damage are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, osteonecrosis, and injury or fracture due to trauma, such as a fall or sports-related incident. Obesity can also put strain on the knee and hip joints.


What is Joint Replacement?

During joint replacement surgery, the damaged joint surfaces are replaced with artificial implants designed to replicate the natural joints. The implants may be made of metal, plastic, or a combination of the two. The material used will be based on several factors that include age, weight and activity level. Your surgeon will discuss the best option for you prior to surgery.

Total Joint Replacement

If the knee or hip joint is too worn and damaged for a partial joint replacement, the entire joint surface and, unavoidably, some surrounding muscle or cartilage tissue will be replaced with artificial components.


First, the damaged surfaces are removed so the bone can be resurfaced, and then the implants are positioned. The implants we use at Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital are designed to enable the artificial joints to move much like a normal, healthy joint. Minimally invasive surgical methods are used when possible to help reduce the likelihood of damage to muscle and tissues, as well as help minimize post-operative pain.


Your surgeon will determine whether you are a candidate for a total knee or total hip replacement using Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology. This groundbreaking technology allows our surgeons to achieve greater accuracy in the alignment and positioning of the joint implant, which offers increased success in providing flexibility of the joint and enabling a faster return to the everyday activities you enjoy.


While the recovery process is different for each patient and is dependent on the surgical method, most patients can consider a return to work and light activity after 3 weeks. Full recovery is typically within 6 months.


The lifespan of the artificial implants is dependent on many factors, including age, weight and activity level, but is typically from 10-20 years.


Click here to learn more about Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement.

Partial Joint Replacement

Not all patients suffering from joint pain need to have a total joint replacement. A partial replacement is always the preferred method when possible, especially in younger patients, or patients who are active, as it offers a great possibility of returning to sports.


With a partial joint replacement, only the damaged area of the joint is replaced. This helps to minimize trauma to the surrounding healthy bone and tissue.


Your orthopedic surgeon will be able to determine whether you’re a candidate for partial joint replacement.


Some patients will be a candidate for a partial knee replacement using Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology. The technology assists your surgeons in positioning the implant based on your anatomy, utilizing 3D technology and a customized, pre-surgical plant. The placement of the implant is essential to the overall success of the implant working properly and to the longevity of the implant, as well as to patient comfort.


Click here to learn more about Robotic-Arm Assisted partial knee replacement.

Preparing for Surgery

Prior to surgery, patients must take necessary steps to prepare for the operation. This might include losing weight and increased activity levels appropriate to ability. After surgery, patients may have to remain in the hospital for 3-4 days for a minimally invasive surgery, or up to 2-3 weeks for conventional surgery, depending on the age, gravity of injury and other health factors.


For many, walking and performing exercises the day after surgery will be possible. Patients must also perform appropriate rehabilitation at home to improve long-term success of the joint replacement. These procedures might include physical therapy and taking medication in addition to any other measures prescribed by the patient's doctor.

Important Information About Hip & Knee Replacement

Hip joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative and rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, fracture of the neck of the femur or functional deformity of the hip.


Knee joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee. Joint replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, severe instability of the joint, or excessive body weight.


Like any surgery, joint replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, bone fracture, change in the treated leg length (hip), joint stiffness, hip joint fusion, amputation, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.


Implant related risks which may lead to a revision of the implant include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), audible sounds during motion, and reaction to particle debris.


The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any joint replacement is limited and depends on several factors like patient weight and activity level. Your doctor will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It is important to closely follow your physician’s instructions regarding post-surgery activity, treatment and follow-up care.

To discuss whether joint replacement is right for you, call 316-462-5088.

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital utilizes Mako™ brand Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery Technology by Stryker. For more information on the technology, you can visit Stryker's website

Hip & Knee Replacement

Does knee or hip pain prevent you from enjoying the things you like to do? Have everyday tasks, like walking up the stairs or getting out of the car, become difficult? Then it may be time to consult with an orthopedic surgeon regarding joint replacement surgery.


We understand that considering joint replacement surgery is a big decision. Our surgeons will be able to diagnose your condition and will then work with you to discuss all your options so you can make the most well-informed decision for your needs.


Our surgeons are skilled in the latest treatment options and surgical techniques for partial and total joint replacement. Some procedures can be performed with the latest advance in technology - Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery - offering surgery that is less invasive and more precise, which means a faster, less painful recovery. Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is the first to introduce this technology in Kansas.


At Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital, the Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology is used for partial knee replacement, total knee replacement, and total hip replacement.

Common Conditions Treated

The most common joint replacement procedures are the hip and knee. The leading causes of joint damage are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, osteonecrosis, and injury or fracture due to trauma, such as a fall or sports-related incident. Obesity can also put strain on the knee and hip joints.


What is Joint Replacement?

During joint replacement surgery, the damaged joint surfaces are replaced with artificial implants designed to replicate the natural joints. The implants may be made of metal, plastic, or a combination of the two. The material used will be based on several factors that include age, weight and activity level. Your surgeon will discuss the best option for you prior to surgery.

Total Joint Replacement

If the knee or hip joint is too worn and damaged for a partial joint replacement, the entire joint surface and, unavoidably, some surrounding muscle or cartilage tissue will be replaced with artificial components.


First, the damaged surfaces are removed so the bone can be resurfaced, and then the implants are positioned. The implants we use at Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital are designed to enable the artificial joints to move much like a normal, healthy joint. Minimally invasive surgical methods are used when possible to help reduce the likelihood of damage to muscle and tissues, as well as help minimize post-operative pain.


Your surgeon will determine whether you are a candidate for a total knee or total hip replacement using Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology. This groundbreaking technology allows our surgeons to achieve greater accuracy in the alignment and positioning of the joint implant, which offers increased success in providing flexibility of the joint and enabling a faster return to the everyday activities you enjoy.


While the recovery process is different for each patient and is dependent on the surgical method, most patients can consider a return to work and light activity after 3 weeks. Full recovery is typically within 6 months.


The lifespan of the artificial implants is dependent on many factors, including age, weight and activity level, but is typically from 10-20 years.


Click here to learn more about Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement.

Partial Joint Replacement

Not all patients suffering from joint pain need to have a total joint replacement. A partial replacement is always the preferred method when possible, especially in younger patients, or patients who are active, as it offers a great possibility of returning to sports.


With a partial joint replacement, only the damaged area of the joint is replaced. This helps to minimize trauma to the surrounding healthy bone and tissue.


Your orthopedic surgeon will be able to determine whether you’re a candidate for partial joint replacement.


Some patients will be a candidate for a partial knee replacement using Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology. The technology assists your surgeons in positioning the implant based on your anatomy, utilizing 3D technology and a customized, pre-surgical plant. The placement of the implant is essential to the overall success of the implant working properly and to the longevity of the implant, as well as to patient comfort.


Click here to learn more about Robotic-Arm Assisted partial knee replacement.

Preparing for Surgery

Prior to surgery, patients must take necessary steps to prepare for the operation. This might include losing weight and increased activity levels appropriate to ability. After surgery, patients may have to remain in the hospital for 3-4 days for a minimally invasive surgery, or up to 2-3 weeks for conventional surgery, depending on the age, gravity of injury and other health factors.


For many, walking and performing exercises the day after surgery will be possible. Patients must also perform appropriate rehabilitation at home to improve long-term success of the joint replacement. These procedures might include physical therapy and taking medication in addition to any other measures prescribed by the patient's doctor.

Important Information About Hip & Knee Replacement

Hip joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative and rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, fracture of the neck of the femur or functional deformity of the hip.


Knee joint replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee. Joint replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, severe instability of the joint, or excessive body weight.


Like any surgery, joint replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, bone fracture, change in the treated leg length (hip), joint stiffness, hip joint fusion, amputation, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.


Implant related risks which may lead to a revision of the implant include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), audible sounds during motion, and reaction to particle debris.


The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any joint replacement is limited and depends on several factors like patient weight and activity level. Your doctor will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It is important to closely follow your physician’s instructions regarding post-surgery activity, treatment and follow-up care.

To discuss whether joint replacement is right for you, call 316-462-5088.

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital utilizes Mako™ brand Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery Technology by Stryker. For more information on the technology, you can visit Stryker's website

On-the-Mark Technology So We Can Get You Back on the Move

Did you know that the knee is the largest joint in the body? It is central to nearly all everyday activities, but that also means it is prone to damage and wear-and-tear. At Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital, our goal is to help patients find relief from knee pain through conservative methods when possible.


When knee replacement surgery is deemed necessary, we’re proud to offer Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology to help patients recover faster and with less pain than traditional surgical methods.


The Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System allows us to achieve unprecedented precision in the placement of the joint implants. This precision is important for many reasons, most importantly, for how the implant feels for the patient. The more accurate the alignment, the more natural the implant feels and the higher the likelihood that the patient can resume participating in the activities they enjoy.

Robotic-Arm Assisted Partial Knee Replacement

With a partial knee replacement, only the damaged area of the knee joint is replaced. However, with traditional surgical methods, partial knee replacements are more difficult and the desired accuracy in the implant placement is often difficult to achieve.


With the Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System, partial knee replacement is an option for adult patients suffering from early to mid-stage osteoarthritis that is contained to only one or two compartments of the knee.


Using this advanced technology, we can perform with smaller incisions and greater accuracy in the placement of the implant. Placement is essential to the implant components working properly. When alignment is off, there is more wear-and-tear on the components, which means their longevity is reduced.


Proper alignment also plays a key factor in the comfort for the patient. With Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology, the components have a more “natural” feel and offer greater flexibility.


During the procedure, the diseased portion of the knee is resurfaced, saving as much of the patient's healthy bone and surrounding tissue as possible. An implant is then secured in the joint to allow the knee to move smoothly again. Robotic-Arm Assisted partial knee replacement may:

  • Facilitate ideal implant positioning that can result in a more natural feeling knee following surgery (1)
  • Result in a more rapid recovery and shorter hospital stay than traditional knee replacement surgery
  • Promote a rapid relief from pain and return to daily activities (2)
Partial Knee Replacement: See How it Works

To discuss whether joint replacement is right for you, call 316-462-5088.

Sources:

  1. 1. Plate JF, Mofi di A, Mannava S, Smith BP, et al. Achieving Accurate Ligament Balancing Using Robotic-Assisted Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty. Advances in Orthopedics 2013(2013): 837167.
  2. 2. Blyth M, Jones B, MacLean A, Anthony I, Rowe P. Accuracy of UKA implant positioning and early clinical outcomes in a RCT comparing robotic assisted nd manual surgery. 13th Annual CAOS Meeting, June 12-15, 2013, Orlando, FL,USA.

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital utilizes Mako™ brand Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery Technology by Stryker. For more information on the technology, you can visit Stryker's website

On-the-Mark Technology So We Can Get You Back on the Move

Did you know that the knee is the largest joint in the body? It is central to nearly all everyday activities, but that also means it is prone to damage and wear-and-tear. At Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital, our goal is to help patients find relief from knee pain through conservative methods when possible.


With this latest technology, we can perform hip and knee replacement surgeries that are less invasive and more precise than traditional methods. Less invasive means faster recovery times for our patients and, typically, better outcomes.


The Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System enables our surgeons to create a personalized surgical plan for each patient, utilizing a 3D anatomical model of the hip or knee. The robotic technology helps guide the surgeon throughout the procedure, ensuring only the diseased or damaged bone is removed. It also ensures accurate positioning of the joint implant, which is essential to the implants working properly and providing optimal patient comfort.

Robotic-Arm Assisted Partial Knee Replacement

With a partial knee replacement, only the damaged area of the knee joint is replaced. However, with traditional surgical methods, partial knee replacements are more difficult and the desired accuracy in the implant placement is often difficult to achieve.


With the Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System, partial knee replacement is an option for adult patients suffering from early to mid-stage osteoarthritis that is contained to only one or two compartments of the knee.


Using this advanced technology, we can perform with smaller incisions and greater accuracy in the placement of the implant. Placement is essential to the implant components working properly. When alignment is off, there is more wear-and-tear on the components, which means their longevity is reduced.


Proper alignment also plays a key factor in the comfort for the patient. With Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology, the components have a more “natural” feel and offer greater flexibility.


During the procedure, the diseased portion of the knee is resurfaced, saving as much of the patient's healthy bone and surrounding tissue as possible. An implant is then secured in the joint to allow the knee to move smoothly again. Robotic-Arm Assisted partial knee replacement may:

  • Facilitate ideal implant positioning that can result in a more natural feeling knee following surgery (1)
  • Result in a more rapid recovery and shorter hospital stay than traditional knee replacement surgery
  • Promote a rapid relief from pain and return to daily activities (2)
Partial Knee Replacement: See How it Works

To discuss whether joint replacement is right for you, call 316-462-5088.

Sources:

  1. Plate JF, Mofi di A, Mannava S, Smith BP, et al. Achieving Accurate Ligament Balancing Using Robotic-Assisted Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty. Advances in Orthopedics 2013(2013): 837167.
  2. Blyth M, Jones B, MacLean A, Anthony I, Rowe P. Accuracy of UKA implant positioning and early clinical outcomes in a RCT comparing robotic assisted nd manual surgery. 13th Annual CAOS Meeting, June 12-15, 2013, Orlando, FL,USA.

Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital utilizes Mako™ brand Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery Technology by Stryker. For more information on the technology, you can visit Stryker's website

Robotic-Arm Assisted Hip Replacement to Get You
Back on the Move

Hip replacement is one of the most common forms of joint replacement. Although osteoarthritis is the most common cause of hip pain, there are other conditions that can lead to the necessity for a total hip replacement, including bone tumors, fractures, injury, or trauma.


The hip joint is made up of two bones - the femur (the head of the thigh bone, also called the ball) and the acetabulum (the hip socket). Total hip replacement surgery involves the removal of the damaged joint, followed by the replacement of a prosthetic implant designed to replicate the hip joint. To achieve this, the socket of the old joint must be hollowed out and smoothed to prepare for the implant. Typically, the artificial ball is made of a strong metal and the socket is made of durable plastic (polyethylene).

Robotic-Arm Assisted Total Hip Replacement

In recent years, total hip replacement surgery has become less invasive. And Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is proud to be the first in Kansas to offer groundbreaking Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology to improve patient outcomes.


With traditional, non-robotic surgery, positioning of the implant is more difficult. When the implant alignment is off, it can lead to patient discomfort, increased wear-and-tear on the implant components, as well as potential hip impingement or dislocation. With the Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System our surgeons can more accurately position the joint implant.


The Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System optimizes implant placement through the use of 3D technology and a patient-specific, pre-operative plan. First, a CT scan will be taken of your joint anatomy. From this scan a 3D model of your hip is created, which the surgeon will use to plan your procedure, specifically mapping out the positioning of the implant. During the actual surgery, the system is surgeon-controlled throughout the entire procedure, but is designed to guide the surgeon to stay within the pre-planned area, minimizing the risk of variance.


Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement is an innovative treatment options for adults suffering from either non-inflammatory or inflammatory degenerative hip joint disease. The technology leads to overall better patient outcomes, with patients reporting a faster recovery period, more natural-feeling joint movement, and greater flexibility of the joint.


The Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement procedure may offer the following benefits (1-2):

  • Increased accuracy and reduced relocation rates versus manual total hip replacement
  • Less blood loss
  • Higher function and activity scores compared to manual total hip replacement


Not everyone is a candidate for Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement. Your surgeon will assess your individual condition and help determine the best approach based on your needs.

To discuss whether joint replacement is right for you, call 316-462-5088.

Sources:

  1. 1. Illgen RL, Bukowski BR, Abiola R. Outcomes after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: Manual Compared with Robotic Assisted Techniques.
  2. 2. Illgen R. Robotic Assisted THA: Reduce Outliers and Predictable Outcomes.43rd Annual Course: Advances in Arthroplasty, October 22-25, 2013, Cambridge, MA.


Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital utilizes Mako™ brand Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery Technology by Stryker. For more information on the technology, you can visit Stryker's website

Robotic-Arm Assisted Hip Replacement to Get You Back on the Move

Hip replacement is one of the most common forms of joint replacement. Although osteoarthritis is the most common cause of hip pain, there are other conditions that can lead to the necessity for a total hip replacement, including bone tumors, fractures, injury, or trauma.


The hip joint is made up of two bones - the femur (the head of the thigh bone, also called the ball) and the acetabulum (the hip socket). Total hip replacement surgery involves the removal of the damaged joint, followed by the replacement of a prosthetic implant designed to replicate the hip joint. To achieve this, the socket of the old joint must be hollowed out and smoothed to prepare for the implant. Typically, the artificial ball is made of a strong metal and the socket is made of durable plastic (polyethylene).

Robotic-Arm Assisted Total Hip Replacement

In recent years, total hip replacement surgery has become less invasive. And Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital is proud to be the first in Kansas to offer groundbreaking Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery technology to improve patient outcomes.


With traditional, non-robotic surgery, positioning of the implant is more difficult. When the implant alignment is off, it can lead to patient discomfort, increased wear-and-tear on the implant components, as well as potential hip impingement or dislocation. With the Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System our surgeons can more accurately position the joint implant.


The Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery System optimizes implant placement through the use of 3D technology and a patient-specific, pre-operative plan. First, a CT scan will be taken of your joint anatomy. From this scan a 3D model of your hip is created, which the surgeon will use to plan your procedure, specifically mapping out the positioning of the implant. During the actual surgery, the system is surgeon-controlled throughout the entire procedure, but is designed to guide the surgeon to stay within the pre-planned area, minimizing the risk of variance.


Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement is an innovative treatment options for adults suffering from either non-inflammatory or inflammatory degenerative hip joint disease. The technology leads to overall better patient outcomes, with patients reporting a faster recovery period, more natural-feeling joint movement, and greater flexibility of the joint.


The Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement procedure may offer the following benefits (1-2):

  • Increased accuracy and reduced relocation rates versus manual total hip replacement
  • Less blood loss
  • Higher function and activity scores compared to manual total hip replacement


Not everyone is a candidate for Robotic-Arm Assisted total hip replacement. Your surgeon will assess your individual condition and help determine the best approach based on your needs.

To discuss whether joint replacement is right for you, call 316-462-5088.

Sources:


  1. 1. Illgen RL, Bukowski BR, Abiola R. Outcomes after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: Manual Compared with Robotic Assisted Techniques.
  2. 2. Illgen R. Robotic Assisted THA: Reduce Outliers and Predictable Outcomes.43rd Annual Course: Advances in Arthroplasty, October 22-25, 2013, Cambridge, MA.


Kansas Spine & Specialty Hospital utilizes Mako™ brand Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery Technology by Stryker. For more information on the technology, you can visit Stryker's website